I’m ready for #AgChatCC15, How ’bout you?

Ag Chat Collegiate Congress is only FIVE days away!!! I’m very excited (In case you hadn’t noticed). Ag Chat Collegiate Congress will be held at Dow AgroSciences in Indianapolis.

That’s right folks, I’ve posted because I have an important message for you! (Yes it really is important, so important I’m typing with an ugly band-aid on my ring finger because my cat just happened to maul it tonight.)

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Continue reading “I’m ready for #AgChatCC15, How ’bout you?”

Her·it·age – Rooted in Agriculture

Heritage is like a belly button – everyone has one. Chances are yours’ like mine is probably rooted in or has some association with agriculture. There are many names my people have adopted throughout the years. German-Russians. Russian-Germans. Russo-Germans. They are all synonymous with a populace espousing a very rich culture oftentimes overlooked in history books.

Heritage is like a belly button – everyone has one. Chances are yours’ like mine is probably rooted in or has some association with agriculture. There are many names my people have adopted throughout the years. German-Russians. Russian-Germans. Russo-Germans. They are all synonymous with a populace espousing a very rich culture oftentimes overlooked in history books.

Schlothauer Family Tree
Schlothauer Family Tree

Exodus

The most notable and massive exodus of Germans into Russia occurred after Catherine II issued her second manifesto on July 22, 1763. Russia had many parcels which were “large contiguous areas of fruitful, uninhabited and unused land” (A people on the Move: Germans in Russia and in the Former Soviet Union: 1763-1997). The manifesto included attractive guarantees such as freedom of religion as well. My ancestors were attracted to the manifesto and particularly to a specific Sugar Company since their knowledge of sugar beet production was extensive.

Julia Seigwart and Henry Sr. Schlothauer
Julia Seigwart and Henry Sr. Schlothauer

My ancestors Henry Sr’s parents left from Hesse (a German province) for the Volga (the Russian steppes) and this is where they made their new life. Oats, wheat and barley were predominantly planted in the volga, though my family farmed sugar beets as well. Henry Sr. Schlothauer was born in Kraft Russia. He then married Julia Siegwart. The manifesto was revoked in 1871 by Alexander I. There was a growing animosity among Russians because of the special rights German immigrants had been granted. The near constant raids of the Cossack s and Bolsheviks were also very frightening. The land Henry Sr. would have amassed was only one acre. They made the brave decision to leave.

America the Beautiful

In September of 1911 my ancestors, carrying their life’s possessions traveled to Germany by train. In Bremerhaven

One of the Schlothauer boys with his invention the "Front Loader"
One of the Schlothauer boys with his invention the “Front Loader”

Germany they boarded the S.S. Brandenburg for the two week trip to the United States of America. Though they paid for first class they were put in steerage with the livestock and other immigrants in terrible conditions. Upon arrival at Ellis Island it was required they have someone to meet them, the promise of a job and two dollars in their pocket. After being segregated, examined and vaccinated and with 75 dollars in his pocket Henry Sr. and his family began the American dream.

After arriving in New York the family traveled to Offerle Kansas. Here Henry Sr. cleaned grain storage bins for $1 a day and Julia took in washing. In 1913 after a failed venture to grow wheat the family moved to Ft. Morgan Colorado. Here the entire family helped with the harvesting of sugar beets. Henry Sr. formed many partnerships and rented various farms throughout his life.

Henry Jr. Schlothauer pulling beets
Henry Jr. Schlothauer pulling beets

In 1939 Heinrich’s son Henry Jr. (my great grandfather) moved his family to Las Cruces, New Mexico. He develped underdevolped land into profitable farm land. He also purchased two ranches located in Deming and Las Vegas, New Mexico. It was through this process that he amassed a sizeable amount of money.
My great grandfather is Henry Schlothauer. His son Gary Schlothauer was almost always involved in the agriculture industry through farming, ranching and trucking having owned Schlothauer Trucking. Today though no longer involved in production agriculture he still enjoys caring for cattle and roping. My father Clay Schlothauer worked on my grandfather’s farms and ranches and was also involved in Schlothauer Trucking. Today he still enjoys competing in roping and is actively involved in the Las Cruces High School FFA Alumni.

As a small child I spent much time out at our arena, the shop and grandGary’s old office. His hideout is a small room with one of the only working bathrooms on the property, a sink, pool table, desk and hundred year old couch with the lingering smell of cattle and dirt. Yes when you sit on it, the dirt rises up from the couch and dances in the sunlight. The entire room is layered with dust and the floor an awful green color of worn concrete. Sometimes in the winter we would watch my grandfather crack pecans as the wood splintered in the background inside the ancient furnace. In the summer’s we would peer out the window’s toward our tire swing to see grandGary inviting us outside to treat us to a watermelon. Little acts of love I will never forget from his tough exterior. The fridge with the hundred year old food but mostly medications and syringes to doctor cattle. The desk and walls  lined with photographs, cartoons, drawings, magazine articles and wood and metal signs of all shapes and sizes my grandfather has collected over the years. I never really understood why he tacked up so many. As I’ve grown I’ve realized that this is his special spot. He want’s to showcase our family’s legacy and our family. Because he is proud of where we came from and how we have prospered.

I come from a line of people who not only lived but prospered. A people that not only survived persecution, but were resilient in the face of adversity. I am proud to say that this is my heritage. I come from a long line of innovators that knew the value of a hard day’s work and were believers in the darkest times of creating a better livelihood for their loved ones. I come from a long line of farmers and ranchers who braved not only the barren Russian terrain but the frightening waves as they traveled across the ocean to the alien plains of the United States. I come from a long line of German Russians.

References
A people on the Move: Germans in Russia and in the Former Soviet Union: 1763-1997

Some thoughts on Starting a Blog about Agriculture

I’m not an expert blogger. But, I do have some experiences I would like to share with those who are thinking they might want to blog about agriculture (or I guess any other topics really). This is what I’ve taken away from my path to starting Dare to Cultivate and my former blog. Hopefully my hours and mistakes will save you some time, money and self doubt!

AgChat logo from http://agchat.org/
AgChat logo from http://agchat.org/

Yesterday evening I participated in #AgChat which is a conversation on Twitter for anyone interested in being a part/is a part of the agriculture community. It takes place every Tuesday from 8 PM to 10 PM ET and is always quite inspiring. A moderator guides agvocates toward productive conversation and a series of questions is posed by the AgChat Foundation. For those interested about the food side of things there is also a #FoodChat. Last night most of the questions surrounded resolutions (of course to help bring in the new year) and also about advice for new agvocates. So, here’s the deal: I’m not an expert blogger. But, I do have some experiences I would like to share with those who are thinking they might want to blog about agriculture (or I guess any other topics really). This is what I’ve taken away from my path to starting Dare to Cultivate and my former blog. Hopefully my hours and mistakes will save you some time, money and self doubt!  Continue reading “Some thoughts on Starting a Blog about Agriculture”

Southwestern Quiche Recipe

Let me begin by saying: I love food! This isn’t exactly a new development for me. I’ve always loved food. But so often it can be easy to forget where our food comes from.

I mean – it comes from the store. Right? Yes, most people purchase their food in a grocery store. But that’s not exactly where it comes from. The food we consume comes from the calloused hands of farmers and ranchers across this great nation.

Let me begin by saying: I love food! This isn’t exactly a new development for me. I’ve always loved food. But so often it can be easy to forget where our food comes from.


I mean – it comes from the store. Right? Yes, most people purchase their food in a grocery store. But that’s not exactly where it comes from. The food we consume comes from the calloused hands of farmers and ranchers across this great nation. There is no “day off”. It’s not paperwork. Living things require constant attention – be it produce or animals. Oh yeah and also life is unpredictable because it is life and these are living organisms. Even if you do everything in your power to make an outcome positive there is still a percentage of unpredictability – no matter how small. Agriculturalists contend with the unpredictability of the weather and the market to bring food home to your table. This is their livelihood. Farming is not always an easy job but they love it. By the way, farmers are also consumers of the final product too. They want to make sure that it’s high quality. Food safety is of paramount importance. But most importantly, they want to make sure that their products are produced ethically and humanely (in the case of animal products).

There are many regulations and audits throughout the food system from producers (farmers and ranchers) and processors  to ensure to their best ability that you can enjoy your food without fear or doubt of how it got there. The whole “foodie” movement (did I spell that right?) has begun to highlight where food comes from again. With less than 2% of the population farming it’s not uncommon to never meet the person that produces your food. That doesn’t mean that they’re not there. It does mean that many grocery shoppers become dazed by the shiny displays and flashy marketing lingo. I mean, who wouldn’t right? But I hope on your next trip to the grocery store you’ll take the time – however brief – to consider the time and passion that brought you this modern convenience.

So….here’s your chance. This is a recipe for Southwestern Quiche. It has green Chile in it, which I must say is just pretty dang fantastic;) Which I have lots of access too, being from New Mexico and all. I think I’d actually go into Chile withdrawal if I moved. Yes, that’s a real thing. You know you’re out of the southwest when people try to pass off Wolf Brand as Chile.

The complete recipe is where the photos conclude.

Yummy quiche!
Yummy quiche!

Ingredients                            Makes: 1 Quiche


  • 1 deep dish pie crust (pkg of 2)
  • 1 c. eggs (approx. 4 eggs)
  • 1 c. cheese – grated
  • 1 c. sauteed vegetables (after they’re cooked) – I used 4 green chiles, 1/2 pkg of spinach, 1/2 small can of mushrooms, 1 bunch of green onions
  • 1 c. meat
  • 1/2 & 1/2
  • garlic salt, black pepper,  red chile pepper, onion powder
  • 2 tbsp butter

Steps

  • defrost green Chile
    defrost green Chile
    slice green Chile lengthwise
    slice green Chile lengthwise
    pull green Chile open from lengthwise cut
    pull green Chile open from lengthwise cut
    Identify veins
    Identify veins
    grasp vein gently and pull away from the body of the Chile
    grasp vein gently and pull away from the body of the Chile
    repeat this step until all veins are removed
    repeat this step until all veins are removed
    need a better visual of what a vein is? Here you go!
    need a better visual of what a vein is? Here you go!
    remove seeds from Chile by running it under water
    remove seeds from Chile by running it under water
    chop the green Chile and repeat the previous steps until all of it is prepped you can also just use frozen green Chile that is defrosted and already chopped:)
    chop the green Chile and repeat the previous steps until all of it is prepped
    you can also just use frozen green Chile that is defrosted and already chopped:)
    wash them green onions
    wash them green onions
    then chop 'em
    then chop ’em
    press the thawed spinach with a spoon through a strainer to eliminate water
    press the thawed spinach with a spoon through a strainer to eliminate water
    combine all prepped veggies in a bowl and mix (I was making a double batch for two quiche's)
    combine all prepped veggies in a bowl and mix (I was making a double batch for two quiche’s)
    melt 2 tbsp of butter into a pan
    melt 2 tbsp of butter into a pan
    make sure to coat it real good:) butter makes the veins extra slickery
    make sure to coat it real good:) butter makes the veins extra slickery
    empty the veggies into the pan
    empty the veggies into the pan
    sautee those things until they cook down into about 1 c.
    sautee those things until they cook down into about 1 c.
    Onto the eggs! Crack 4 eggs into a mixing bowl (hey look they're smiling:) and add 1/2 & 1/2 to get ideal consistency
    Onto the eggs! Crack 4 eggs into a mixing bowl (hey look they’re smiling:) and add 1/2 & 1/2 to get ideal consistency
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    Add in 1 c. of meat – your choice (I threw in leftover chicken)
    Season with garlic salt, red Chile pepper, black pepper and onion powder. Also add in 1 c. of cheese
    Season with garlic salt, red Chile pepper, black pepper and onion powder. Also add in 1 c. of cheese
    add sautee'd vegetables in with egg mix
    add sautee’d vegetables in with egg mix
    spoon the mix into the pie crust
    spoon the mix into the pie crust
    Place pie into baking dish or on cookie sheet & make the edges fancy schmancy with a fork
    Place pie into baking dish or on cookie sheet & make the edges fancy schmancy with a fork. Bake it for 1 hr at 375 degrees.
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    Wallah you’ve got a quiche;)
    Bon Appetite!
    Bon Appetite!

    Thanks for reading! Enjoy (I know I will:) Ingredients

    • 1 deep dish pie crust (pkg of 2)
    • 1 c. eggs (approx. 4 eggs)
    • 1 c. cheese – grated
    • 1 c. sauteed vegetables (after they’re cooked) – I used 4 green chiles, 1/2 pkg of spinach, 1/2 small can of mushrooms, 1 bunch of green onions
    • 1 c. meat
    • 1/2 & 1/2
    • garlic salt, black pepper,  red chile pepper, onion powder
    • 2 tbsp butter

    Steps:

  • Prep vegetables (you’ll need about 2 c. of fresh vegetables to have 1 c. of sautee’d vegetables roughly) I used green Chile, spinach, mushrooms and green onions
  • Sautee the vegetables in butter
  • Mix 4 eggs, half & half, 1 c. (or about 4) eggs, 1 c. of meat (I used chicken) and 1 c. cheese with garlic salt, black pepper, red Chile powder and onion powder
  • Combine egg mixture and vegetables
  • Pour egg vegetable mixture into deep dish pie crust and nest in/on baking pan/cooking sheet
  • Bake at 375 degrees for 1 hr (or until top is browned)
  • Let cool for 30 minutes

2014 in Photos – The year in review

Everyone seems to be looking back over the previous year. To be fair, mine was supercalifragalisticexpalidoxious (is that how you spell it?). This was for many reasons, but one of the main ones was that In 2014 I discovered I loved photography.

Everyone seems to be looking back over the previous year. To be honest, mine was pretty fantastic! In 2014 I discovered I loved photography. To be fair, I’d never had an inkling that this was something I wanted to pursue. But – this past semester at school I had the opportunity to take an “Introduction to Photography” class and it was absolutely fantastic. It gave me a genuine appreciation for digital as it was a black and white class. Legitimate black and white. Like developing and printing in a dark room. The photos below were taken between September and the conclusion of the year. Some are from my Iphone. I know they’re not the best quality but I didn’t have a camera with my 24/7. Others are taken deliberately with a DSLR. At any rate I did thoroughly enjoy composing them and I just had to share!

Thanks for reading!

-Lauren

Happy “Moo” Year!!! – New year New site

My new year’s resolution is to be a better advocate for agriculture! What’s yours?

Hey there everybody! We “Moooved”!

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Sorry, I just had too, this picture turned out way too cute. Anyhow, I decided to move my blog and start fresh. It is the new year after all, so why not? I’ve learned an awful lot from the past year.

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